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What Causes Air In Water Pipes With A Well?- Easy Solution

What-Causes-Air-In-Water-Pipes-With-A-WellWhat causes air in water pipes?

Or, in other words, “why does my well have air in the water”?

The number one question regarding wells is, “My well has air. What can I do?”.

Air in your well water system is a real physics problem with many possible causes, most if not all of which you can diagnose and fix easily.

What Causes Air In Water Pipes?

Water can have various issues, from unsafe iron levels or bad taste to coliform bacteria. In fact, well water isn’t always well water, and there’s more in yours than you might think.

Air in the supply pipes is problematic because it leaves a vacuum that will allow bacteria to thrive and can cause foul smells through the water system.

Air bubbles in the water lines indicate air has built up within the plumbing. It may be caused by several issues, including extreme weather changes, high-pressure faucets, leaky supply pipes, or property upheavals.

Causes Of Air In Water Pipes From 

There are several reasons why water lines can develop bubbles and air pockets, and it’s important to understand what they are so you can take action to fix the problem.

Improperly Installed Pump

If your pump is installed improperly or damaged, it can cause the air in the system and lead to some major problems. It is especially true if there are any leaks in your piping system and they aren’t being repaired quickly enough.

Soil Compaction

Soil-Compaction

If there is too much soil around the well and not enough gravel or sand to help support it properly, this can lead to air being pushed up into the pipes as they fill with water during pumping operations. It is especially problematic if high winds or other weather conditions cause soil movement near the well site—and, therefore, soil compaction near the well site as well!

Corrosion

Air can easily enter the line If your pipes are corroded or rusted. It is true for any material that has been in contact with water for an extended period. The best way to prevent this is to inspect your pipes regularly and repair any damage as quickly as possible.

Sediment

If you live in an area with heavy sediment in your water supply, air bubbles can form when the sediment settles out at the bottom of your pipes over time. 

The Water Level Is Too Tigh

If your water level is too high, the pressure in your well can be too great and cause air to enter the pipes. To avoid this problem, ensure your pump is set to cycle on and off at least once every 10 minutes. If you have a continuous flow pump, it should be set to cycle on and off every 2 hours.

No Water, Low Pressure, Air in Water lines. Here’s Why! #1 Troubleshooting video

Water Hammer

Water hammer is a common cause of air in water lines from a well. The pressure in your pipes can increase so quickly when you turn on a faucet that it creates a shock wave that travels through the pipe, causing it to vibrate or “hammer.” It can cause air bubbles inside the pipes, leading to air in your water lines.

Air Lock

An air lock occurs when there is too much pressure between two sides of a valve, and one side doesn’t open completely. It causes air bubbles in your pipes and can lead to air in your water lines.

Low Flow

If there isn’t enough pressure or flow through your pipes, it can cause them to collapse under their weight, which will trap air at one end of the pipe and cause it to bubble up into your faucets, showerheads, dishwashers, and more!

Temperature Changes

Temperature-Changes
What causes air in water pipes?

Or, in other words, “why does my well have air in the water”?

The number one question regarding wells is, “My well has air. What can I do?”.

Air in your well water system is a real physics problem with many possible causes, most if not all of which you can diagnose and fix easily.

What Causes Air In Water Pipes?

Water can have various issues, from unsafe iron levels or bad taste to coliform bacteria. In fact, well water isn’t always well water, and there’s more in yours than you might think.

Air in the supply pipes is problematic because it leaves a vacuum that will allow bacteria to thrive and can cause foul smells through the water system.

Air bubbles in the water lines indicate air has built up within the plumbing. It may be caused by several issues, including extreme weather changes, high-pressure faucets, leaky supply pipes, or property upheavals.

Causes Of Air In Water Pipes From

There are several reasons why water lines can develop bubbles and air pockets, and it’s important to understand what they are so you can take action to fix the problem.

Improperly Installed Pump

If your pump is installed improperly or damaged, it can cause the air in the system and lead to some major problems. It is especially true if there are any leaks in your piping system and they aren’t being repaired quickly enough.

Soil Compaction

Soil-Compaction

If there is too much soil around the well and not enough gravel or sand to help support it properly, this can lead to air being pushed up into the pipes as they fill with water during pumping operations. It is especially problematic if high winds or other weather conditions cause soil movement near the well site—and, therefore, soil compaction near the well site as well!

Corrosion

Air can easily enter the line If your pipes are corroded or rusted. It is true for any material that has been in contact with water for an extended period. The best way to prevent this is to inspect your pipes regularly and repair any damage as quickly as possible.

Sediment

If you live in an area with heavy sediment in your water supply, air bubbles can form when the sediment settles out at the bottom of your pipes over time.

The Water Level Is Too Tigh

If your water level is too high, the pressure in your well can be too great and cause air to enter the pipes. To avoid this problem, ensure your pump is set to cycle on and off at least once every 10 minutes. If you have a continuous flow pump, it should be set to cycle on and off every 2 hours.

No Water, Low Pressure, Air in Water lines. Here’s Why! #1 Troubleshooting video

Water Hammer

Water hammer is a common cause of air in water lines from a well. The pressure in your pipes can increase so quickly when you turn on a faucet that it creates a shock wave that travels through the pipe, causing it to vibrate or “hammer.” It can cause air bubbles inside the pipes, leading to air in your water lines.

Air Lock

An air lock occurs when there is too much pressure between two sides of a valve, and one side doesn’t open completely. It causes air bubbles in your pipes and can lead to air in your water lines.

Low Flow

If there isn’t enough pressure or flow through your pipes, it can cause them to collapse under their weight, which will trap air at one end of the pipe and cause it to bubble up into your faucets, showerheads, dishwashers, and more!

Temperature Changes

Temperature-Changes

When temperatures change rapidly (such as during winter), water expands, and contracts, which puts additional stress on your pipes and may cause them to crack or burst open—leaving air pockets behind that could lead to air in your water lines.

Easy Ways To Fix It

It can be frustrating when your water well produces air instead of water. The most common cause for this problem is air trapped in the well piping system. This air will appear as bubbles or pockets of air in your faucet and shower heads. It can also cause the pressure inside your pipes to drop significantly.

There are a few easy ways to fix this problem:

  1. You can remove the pipes from your well and run them into a bucket of water to remove any trapped air. Then you would rebuild your well piping system using new pipe and fittings. This method will work, but it is very time-consuming and expensive.
  2. You can inject pressurized water into each pipe until all trapped air has been removed from inside the pipe (this method costs less than removing all the pipes).
  3. Check the Well Pump. If the air comes from your good pump, the most likely culprit is a broken impeller. To check if this is the problem, turn off the power to your pump and remove the cover. Look where the impeller meets the shaft; replace it if you see any damage or cracks.
  4. Check for Corrosion and Leaks Around Your Well. If there’s no leak, check for loose parts or connections between valves and parts – look for anything that might be able to cause an air pocket in the line.

Tightened the loose parts and back up until they stay securely attached without falling off again later on down the road when more pressure builds up on them from heavy usage over time.

  1. If you are still unable to fix the problem, we recommend hiring an experienced plumber who knows how to deal with wells and seal them up properly.

Conclusion

In this blog post, we’ve discussed various causes and solutions of air in water pipes from a well. Water filters through the ground and picks up minerals and other elements on its way to your home. It can create a build-up of sediment in the pipes that can cause air pockets—and we’ve shown you how to deal with that issue.

If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below.
When temperatures change rapidly (such as during winter), water expands, and contracts, which puts additional stress on your pipes and may cause them to crack or burst open—leaving air pockets behind that could lead to air in your water lines.

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